Bush Dyed Organic Cotton Baby Onesie by Bernadette Watt

Bush Dyed Organic Cotton Baby Onesie by Bernadette Watt

Size: 6-12 months

 

The Baby onesies are made from organic and carbon neutral cotton, and are hand-dyed on remote Aboriginal communities across the Groote Eylandt Archipelago, off the Gulf of Carpentaria.

Anindilyakwa women hold ancient knowledge of their country. Colours within the fabric are harvested from natural dyes from native plant life and discarded metal objects found on community.

The dying process begins with a bush trip that draws on traditional knowledge to find and collect roots, leaves, bark and berries that have always been used in traditional dyeing practices. The women carefully design each garment, binding each piece with leaves and found objects from community to place on the boil. It’s then time for a cuppa and to wait and watch the silk transform from white into a unique reflection of the land.

We make every effort to ensure colours display accurately online, however, display colour does vary.

This garment has been rinsed but not washed, we recommend cold hand washing separately with mild non-bleaching detergent or shampoo. Do not dry clean, tumble dry, soak in hot water or bleach.

Due to the nature of the bush dyeing process, the colour of this product may transfer to other objects, we recommend avoiding contact with light coloured surfaces.

 

About Bernadette Watt:

Bernadette was born in Mount Isa, and her island home is Mornington Island, (Baralkis). She moved to Groote Eylandt with her family when she was 7 years old. Bernadette learnt from her brothers how to paint and the stories behind the paintings.

“I would watch how they did paintings of the Wurlywin Man, Brolga Lady, rats and squid. I still paint some of those stories now. Because of my dad Arnold Watt, he was great artist. I just want to be like my dad.  I have three children, one niece, one nephew, and a grandson. And I love my family.

When I first moved to Groote Eylandt with my mum, my dad Eric Amagula, my step father, he raised me up to be the person that I want to be. How to be strong and believe in myself.”

Bernadette paints, makes jewellery, plant dyes, screen prints. She enjoys doing everything with all the women.

“We go out to Umbakumba community on the other side of the Eylandt, to Malkala (an outstation) and fly to Milyakburra on Bickerton Island to dye with other women. Sometimes we visit aged care too. The old ladies there like to do dyeing. Dyeing is good fun. It makes the women come together and chat while we dye. They really enjoy doing it.

We go out and collect old steel, dig out plant roots for the yellow dye and collect other leaves to make the black colour. We then come back to the Arts Centre, crunch up the leaves and wrap the fabric tightly around bits of steel. We then boil up two billies, one with the yellow dye and another for black. When they have been in the dye long enough we wash them out and hang them to dry outside community.

I love living here in Angurugu. It’s a good place with friendly people you can look up to. It’s a nice place. My children grew up on Milyakburra, a community on Bikkerton Island just off the coast of Groote Eylandt. There are lots of lovely fishing spots around Groote Eylandt and Bikkerton Island. I also love working at the Arts Centre here, doing dying and screen printing.

My  artwork with my Auntie Annabell Amagula was nominated for a 2018 Telstra Art Award. We enjoyed making this film and it was very hard work for both of us. But we enjoyed it and we are so proud of what we have done, working with the two communities and Naina Sen and Aly de Groot. And we are both proud of what we have done together.”

 

Community:

Angurugu, NT

Language:

Anindilyakwa

  • Description

    Made at Anindilyakwa Arts, Groote Eylandt NT

AU$49.95Price

Shop Homelands acknowledges the Traditional Owners of Country throughout Australia and recognises their continuing connection to lands, waters, culture and community. We pay our respect to them and their cultures; and to Elders past, present and future.

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